All visits: 5644015
Unique visits: 5450267





 

 

 


History of the residence


1735 – Voivode Michał Bieliński wed Tekla Pepłowska. Tekla’s grandmother Jadwiga Niemyska, wife of a Lublin junior judge, had bequeathed the Kozłówka estate to her.

1742 – The then-already-existing Kozłówka palace is first mentioned – the venue of a baptism ceremony of Franciszek Bieliński, Michał and Tekla’s son at that date. The building, erected between 1735 and 1742, was probably designed by Józef Fontana.

1799 – Franciszek Bieliński sells Kozłówka to Aleksander Zamoyski, 11th heir-in-tail of Zamość. After Aleksander deceased (in 1800), the estate was transferred to his sister Anna Sapieżyna (Sapieha), with the right of life estate for the heir’s widow Maria nee Granowska.

1836 – Anna sells the estate to her nephew Jan Zamoyski.

1870 – Konstanty Zamoyski, the elder son of Jan and Anna nee Mycielska, marries with Aniela Potocka, daughter of Tomasz and Wanda nee Ossolińska. The bride and the groom settle down at Kozłówka, the estate having been passed on to Konstanty by his father. As a dowry, Aniela endowed a yard in Foksal St. in Warsaw where in 1870s the Zamoyskis built a palace designed by Leandro Marconi.

1897–1914 – The palace complex in Kozłówka is rebuilt and redeveloped.

1903 – The entailed estate of Kozłówka is established by tsar Nicholas II.

1917 – Aniela Zamoyska, nee Potocka, dies.

1923 – Konstanty Zamoyski, 1st heir-in-tail of Kozłówka, dies without progeny. The entailed estate is taken over by Adam, his first cousin.

1930 – Death of Adam’s wife, Maria Zamoyska, nee Potocka, 2nd heiress-in-tail of Kozłówka.

1940 – Adam Zamoyski dies at the palace in Foksal St. in Warsaw. He was buried beside his wife, in the Kozłówka park, by the palace chapel. The estate’s ownership was passed to Aleksander, Adam and Maria’s elder son, married to Jadwiga nee Brzozowska.

1941 – During the German occupation, Aleksander Zamoyski is arrested by the Gestapo and imprisoned in the concentration camp of Auschwitz and subsequently, Dachau.

1944 – Jadwiga Zamoyska, together with her children Adam, Maria and Andrzej, leaves Kozłówka as she fears the approaching front. She takes with her to Warsaw the most precious works of art, most of which most regrettably gets lost in the Warsaw Uprising. The Zamoyski family  eventually emigrate to Canada in 1948.

1944 – The former Kozłówka entailed estate is taken over by the State, together with the palace-and-park complex, under the Agricultural Reform Decree enacted by the newly established communist authorities.